Kherson

House of the merchant Medvedev

Description

  • The exterior of the house contains eclecticism with elements of classicism and rococo.
  • Recognized as an architectural monument of local importance.

The exterior of the house contains eclecticism with elements of classicism and rococo. It was originally built as a residential building, but events changed its function from time to time. Until 1957, with which the State Archives of the Kherson Region now works in it. Recognized as an architectural monument of local importance.

The exterior of the house contains eclecticism with elements of classicism and rococo. It was originally built as a residential building, but events changed its function from time to time. Until 1957, with which the State Archives of the Kherson Region now works in it. Recognized as an architectural monument of local importance.

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HISTORY

  • Appeared as a residential - for the merchant of the second guild Zinovy Medvedev, his wife and 6 children.
  • In 1920, the mansion was nationalized by the Bolsheviks. The layout inside was divided into smaller rooms, so that several apartments could fit.
  • In 1944, after the liberation of Kherson from the invaders, one of the buildings of the Vodnikov hospital was placed here.
  • Since 1957 - the State Archive of the Kherson region.

In 1900, the house first appeared in the city. Appeared as a residential - for the merchant of the second guild Zinovy Medvedev, his wife and 6 children. As a remembrance that they lived here, there was a Dutch oven that stood in the largest room, most likely to receive guests.

In 1917, the Red Revolution breaks out, followed by the Civil War. Of the children, only two out of six survived the war. With the surviving members of the family, Medvedev moved to Moscow, where his life ended in the 30s.

In 1920, the mansion was nationalized by the Bolsheviks. The layout inside was divided into smaller rooms, so that several apartments could fit. Documents for 1922 indicate that among the tenants then there were 2 families.

In 1900, the house first appeared in the city. Appeared as a residential - for the merchant of the second guild Zinovy Medvedev, his wife and 6 children. As a remembrance that they lived here, there was a Dutch oven that stood in the largest room, most likely to receive guests.

In 1917, the Red Revolution breaks out, followed by the Civil War. Of the children, only two out of six survived the war. With the surviving members of the family, Medvedev moved to Moscow, where his life ended in the 30s.

In 1920, the mansion was nationalized by the Bolsheviks. The layout inside was divided into smaller rooms, so that several apartments could fit. Documents for 1922 indicate that among the tenants then there were 2 families.