Dnipro

BUILDING SCHOOL №58

Description

  • In the 1820s - 1830s. here housed a complex of wooden houses for factory officials.
  • The first owners of the manor are not installed.

The territory of the modern mansion was a part of the complex of Katerinoslav State Drawing Factory since 1792. In the 1820s - 1830s, the territory was occupied by a complex of wooden residential buildings intended for the factory officials. Upon the Factory closure in 1837, the buildings were sold for demolition.

The territory remained undeveloped for a long time and was a part of Factory Square. In the late 1860s, a special project was developed for the planning of the territory of the Factory Square. The exact date of sale of the land plot according to this plan is unidentified as well as the first owners of the mansion.

In the early 1880's, Land Plots No. 5 and No. 6 were owned by Sergiy Romanovich Gippius, a process engineer (according to the Factory Square plan). On 13 September (the old style), 1882, Gippius sold his mansion to Jacob Jacovlevich Fast, a settler of Khortytsia colony of Katerynoslavsky district.

The territory of the modern mansion was a part of the complex of Katerinoslav State Drawing Factory since 1792. In the 1820s - 1830s, the territory was occupied by a complex of wooden residential buildings intended for the factory officials. Upon the Factory closure in 1837, the buildings were sold for demolition.

The territory remained undeveloped for a long time and was a part of Factory Square. In the late 1860s, a special project was developed for the planning of the territory of the Factory Square. The exact date of sale of the land plot according to this plan is unidentified as well as the first owners of the mansion.

In the early 1880's, Land Plots No. 5 and No. 6 were owned by Sergiy Romanovich Gippius, a process engineer (according to the Factory Square plan). On 13 September (the old style), 1882, Gippius sold his mansion to Jacob Jacovlevich Fast, a settler of Khortytsia colony of Katerynoslavsky district.

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HISTORY

  • The first tenants: jewelry store LM. Goldstein and H. Rosenberg's tea house, were housed in the new building already in September 1902, now it is still listed as unfinished, without central heating and electricity.
  • The features of the housing include the use of metal bearing structures.
  • In the middle of 1915 the building of Fovitsky's gymnasium was also considered from the point of view of accommodation for a hospital.

While owned by Ja. Ja. Fast, the mansion witnessed several commercial buildings constructed along the Katherininsky Avenue on its territory. On 8 January (the old style), 1899, Ja.Ja. Fast divided the mansion, having sold Land Plot No 5 at the corner of Katherininsky Avenue and Khrestova Street to Isaac Abramovich Raginsky, a merchant, and to Boruch-Hersh Abramovich Raginsky, a petit bourgeois, with the plot coming under their joint ownership. On 26 November (old style), 1902, upon the death of Boruch-Hersh Abramovich Raginsky, the part of the mansion owned by him passed to his son, Moses Borukh-Gershovich Raginsky, a student. However, already on 19 December (the old style), 1902, Moses sold his share to Olexander-Zis Abramovich Raginsky, a merchant.

Apart from the change of owners, in 1902 the mansion witnessed a large-scale reconstruction. In September 1902, a new building was occupied by the first tenants, namely the jewelry store of L.M. Goldstein. At that time, the mansion was still registered as incomplete without central heating and electricity. Such a rapid commissioning of two commercial premises is likely due to the fact that both tenants had their previous premises demolished in the course of the new building construction and posed requirements for the quickest restoration of their commercial facilities. In general, the construction was completed only in 1904. Since October 1904, the second floor of the building was rent and was occupied by the Commercial School of the Society of Mutual Assistance of Salesclerks (later on The Second Commercial College).

The mansion was a three-storied building with a cellar adapted for stores. The stores of the first floor had a mezzanine. The features of the building include the use of metal bearing structures. The main facades of the building are designed in the rational modernism style. Initially, the facade also had separate molding inserts. The building was designed by D.K. Thyssen, an architect.

On 23 July (the old style.), 1908, Olexander-Zis Raginsky bought the share of the building belonging to I.A. Raginsky as per the sharing act, and thus, became the sole owner of the mansion.

Since 1908, the mansion was occupied by a proportion of classrooms of the private male gymnasium of O. L. Fovitsky that occupied the third floor. Once the Second Commercial College moved from the building in 1910, the gymnasium of Fovitsky occupied the second floor of the building as well. Already in August 1914, the Second Non-Classical Secondary school moved into the gymnasium premises, with the building earlier occupied by the Second Non-classical Secondary transformed into a military hospital. In mid 1915, the premises of the gymnasium of Fovitsky were also considered from the point of view of transformation into a military hospital, though these plans were not implemented.
In 1921, the gymnasium of Fovitsky was reorganized into a labor school. In 1924, an evening labor faculty named after the October Revolution was opened instead of the school, with the faculty reassigned to the Metallurgical Institute since 1930. Labor faculties were designed to prepare primary school graduates to enter higher education institutions. In addition, stores on the first floor of the mansion continued to work. The labor faculty was abolished in 1934 – 1935 due to the reform of secondary and higher education. Since then, the mansion has been occupied by Secondary school No 58.

According to unverified information, during 1941 – 1943, the premises of the school were used to quarter German military units. In the period 1944 – 1947, the school was occupied by the Flour Milling Technical School. Upon its removal in 1947, the mansion was occupied by the Office of Highways, but already in 1948, the Office was forced to return the premises to High School No. 58 which has been working in the mansion ever since.

In 1921 Fovitsky's gymnasium was reorganized into a labor school. In 1924, instead of the school was opened evening faculty of them. October Revolution (since 1930, passed the subordination of the Metallurgical Institute). Rabfaki intended to prepare graduates of primary schools for admission to higher educational institutions. In addition, shops continued to work on the first floor of the house. Rabfak was liquidated in 1934 - 1935. in connection with the reform of secondary and higher education.Since that time, the secondary school No. 58 has been working in the house. According to unverified reports in 1941 - 1943, the school building was used for placing German military units. In 1944 - 1947 years. The school premises were occupied by the Flour Technical School. According to his inference in 1947, here is located the Highway Administration. But the following year it was forced to return the premises to the secondary school No. 58, which works in the house and now.

While owned by Ja. Ja. Fast, the mansion witnessed several commercial buildings constructed along the Katherininsky Avenue on its territory. On 8 January (the old style), 1899, Ja.Ja. Fast divided the mansion, having sold Land Plot No 5 at the corner of Katherininsky Avenue and Khrestova Street to Isaac Abramovich Raginsky, a merchant, and to Boruch-Hersh Abramovich Raginsky, a petit bourgeois, with the plot coming under their joint ownership. On 26 November (old style), 1902, upon the death of Boruch-Hersh Abramovich Raginsky, the part of the mansion owned by him passed to his son, Moses Borukh-Gershovich Raginsky, a student. However, already on 19 December (the old style), 1902, Moses sold his share to Olexander-Zis Abramovich Raginsky, a merchant.

Apart from the change of owners, in 1902 the mansion witnessed a large-scale reconstruction. In September 1902, a new building was occupied by the first tenants, namely the jewelry store of L.M. Goldstein. At that time, the mansion was still registered as incomplete without central heating and electricity. Such a rapid commissioning of two commercial premises is likely due to the fact that both tenants had their previous premises demolished in the course of the new building construction and posed requirements for the quickest restoration of their commercial facilities. In general, the construction was completed only in 1904. Since October 1904, the second floor of the building was rent and was occupied by the Commercial School of the Society of Mutual Assistance of Salesclerks (later on The Second Commercial College).

The mansion was a three-storied building with a cellar adapted for stores. The stores of the first floor had a mezzanine. The features of the building include the use of metal bearing structures. The main facades of the building are designed in the rational modernism style. Initially, the facade also had separate molding inserts. The building was designed by D.K. Thyssen, an architect.

On 23 July (the old style.), 1908, Olexander-Zis Raginsky bought the share of the building belonging to I.A. Raginsky as per the sharing act, and thus, became the sole owner of the mansion.

Since 1908, the mansion was occupied by a proportion of classrooms of the private male gymnasium of O. L. Fovitsky that occupied the third floor. Once the Second Commercial College moved from the building in 1910, the gymnasium of Fovitsky occupied the second floor of the building as well. Already in August 1914, the Second Non-Classical Secondary school moved into the gymnasium premises, with the building earlier occupied by the Second Non-classical Secondary transformed into a military hospital. In mid 1915, the premises of the gymnasium of Fovitsky were also considered from the point of view of transformation into a military hospital, though these plans were not implemented.
In 1921, the gymnasium of Fovitsky was reorganized into a labor school. In 1924, an evening labor faculty named after the October Revolution was opened instead of the school, with the faculty reassigned to the Metallurgical Institute since 1930. Labor faculties were designed to prepare primary school graduates to enter higher education institutions. In addition, stores on the first floor of the mansion continued to work. The labor faculty was abolished in 1934 – 1935 due to the reform of secondary and higher education. Since then, the mansion has been occupied by Secondary school No 58.

According to unverified information, during 1941 – 1943, the premises of the school were used to quarter German military units. In the period 1944 – 1947, the school was occupied by the Flour Milling Technical School. Upon its removal in 1947, the mansion was occupied by the Office of Highways, but already in 1948, the Office was forced to return the premises to High School No. 58 which has been working in the mansion ever since.

In 1921 Fovitsky's gymnasium was reorganized into a labor school. In 1924, instead of the school was opened evening faculty of them. October Revolution (since 1930, passed the subordination of the Metallurgical Institute). Rabfaki intended to prepare graduates of primary schools for admission to higher educational institutions. In addition, shops continued to work on the first floor of the house. Rabfak was liquidated in 1934 - 1935. in connection with the reform of secondary and higher education.Since that time, the secondary school No. 58 has been working in the house. According to unverified reports in 1941 - 1943, the school building was used for placing German military units. In 1944 - 1947 years. The school premises were occupied by the Flour Technical School. According to his inference in 1947, here is located the Highway Administration. But the following year it was forced to return the premises to the secondary school No. 58, which works in the house and now.

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Since 1792 the territory of the modern manor was part of the Ekaterinoslav State Cloth Factory.
  • In the late 1860's. A special project for the planning of the territory of the factory square was developed.
  • In 1902, in addition to the change of owners, the large-scale reconstruction of the estate begins.
  • In 1921 Fovitsky's gymnasium was reorganized into a labor school.
  • According to unconfirmed reports in 1941 - 1943. The premises of the school were used for placing German military units.
  • Since 1792 the territory of the modern manor was part of the Ekaterinoslav State Cloth Factory.
  • In the late 1860's. A special project for the planning of the territory of the factory square was developed.
  • In 1902, in addition to the change of owners, the large-scale reconstruction of the estate begins.
  • In 1921 Fovitsky's gymnasium was reorganized into a labor school.
  • According to unconfirmed reports in 1941 - 1943. The premises of the school were used for placing German military units.