Kropyvnitsky

House of Mightus

Description

The synagogue was built in 1897 by architect Alexander Lyshnevsky. The building is built in eclectic style with elements of romantic Moorish style. The Great Synagogue belongs to the outstanding heritage of the architectural school of eclecticism in Ukraine.

The courtyard of the synagogue is equipped with a square and a memorial sign in memory of the murdered Jews during the Nazi occupation of the land.

The synagogue was built in 1897 by architect Alexander Lyshnevsky. The building is built in eclectic style with elements of romantic Moorish style. The Great Synagogue belongs to the outstanding heritage of the architectural school of eclecticism in Ukraine.

The courtyard of the synagogue is equipped with a square and a memorial sign in memory of the murdered Jews during the Nazi occupation of the land.

How to get there?

This building is located in the central part of the city. The nearest public transport stop is the Star Theater Cinema. At this stop urban communal routes, namely trolleybus route № 4, № 10, 10A, bus routes № 116 and № 130, stop at this stop. No 27, No 55, No 77, No 104, No 108, No 113, No 115.

And also nearby

HISTORY

  • The modern synagogue was built in 1897 on the site of the old synagogue, which was destroyed at the end of the nineteenth century due to the accident of structures. The architect is Alexander Lyshnevsky, the author of a large number of structures in Kropyvnytskyi. In 1913, there were 13 Jewish prayer buildings in the city. Both then and now it is the main Jewish cult building in Kropyvnytskyi.

In the 60s of the twentieth century, during the Soviet Union, a club was set up in the city synagogue, where a theatrical circle operated. After independence of Ukraine, the authorities returned the house to the Jewish community.

Today, it is an important urban center for Jewish culture, religion, and charity. The synagogue building houses the Jewish Museum of Elisavetgrad, established in 1994.

In the 60s of the twentieth century, during the Soviet Union, a club was set up in the city synagogue, where a theatrical circle operated. After independence of Ukraine, the authorities returned the house to the Jewish community.

Today, it is an important urban center for Jewish culture, religion, and charity. The synagogue building houses the Jewish Museum of Elisavetgrad, established in 1994.